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Mentalist Max Maven



A Max Maven website

The Los Angeles Daily News called him \"a master showman.\" The St. Louis Post-Dispatch dubbed him \"a master of repartee.\" Television\'s Entertainment Tonight summed it up: \"He\'s the master mindreader.\" Indeed. Using an advanced (and highly unorthodox) set of psychological principles and techniques, Max is able to discern the thoughts of total strangers. Subliminal persuasion and the power of suggestion are pushed to the limit. People magazine hailed his work as \"a new form of participatory theater.\" Max Maven has appeared on the covers of over thirty magazines; here are some recent examples from Italy, Austria, Canada and the United States. This is weird stuff--and audiences love it. Max Maven\'s mysteries transcend linguistic and cultural boundaries: He\'s performed in over two dozen countries. His full-evening one-man show, Thinking in Person, had a critically acclaimed two-month run at the Beverly Hills Playhouse, and he has headlined nightclubs across the U.S., setting house records in over half of those venues. Max has appeared on hundreds of television and radio programs, top talkshows and variety specials, as well as acting on comedy and dramatic shows including the starring role on Count DeClues\' Mystery Castle for the Fox network, and guest-starring on Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and General Hospital. In 1998, Max developed and starred in a new Canadian series, The MAXimum Dimension, an offbeat educational show aimed at younger viewers, involving recreational mathematics. The 26 episodes were a popular success, placing among the top six shows on the TVO network. Other TV credits include hosting eight network specials in Japan (performing in Japanese), and creating a pair of his own specials in Thailand. In 1994 he hosted a 12-part series for HTV in England, Something Strange with Max Maven, a talk-show exploring all aspects of the paranormal. The show set a ratings record, and led to a second series the following year. Max Mystery Show, a 13-part series, was a hit for the CTS network in Taiwan in 1995. He was the only regular on the ten-part Magiskt series for TV4 in Sweden; that show scored great ratings, and two more series followed, one for Norwegian television in early 1996, plus another for Sweden later that year. He has also appeared on shows in Finland, Scotland, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Chile, and many other countries. Max is prominently featured on the 1998 PBS documentary The Art of Magic, as well as The Secret World on The Learning Channel. His television work in the year 2000 includes an appearance on Heroes of Magic on Channel 4 in Great Britain, and being the only regular guest on the Masters of Illusion series for the PAX network. Max is particularly well known for his pioneering work in interactive broadcasting. He created the ground-breaking video Max Maven\'s Mindgames for MCA. His games were a regular feature on the popular Best of Magic series for the ITV network in England. His interactive work was included on The World\'s Greatest Magic, NBC\'s highest rated special of 1994, and he was the first artist booked for the 1995 edition, and brought back yet again in 1997. When Landmark Entertainment developed Caesars Magical Empire for Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, they asked Max to devise a set of interactive mysteries that take place between customers and an impish wizard, \"Maximus Maven\" eight inches tall, who appears \"holographically\" behind the central bar. The wizard is named \"Maximus Maven,\" and he bears an uncanny resemblance to a certain modern performer. Max has also devised material for the world of computer technology, creating an interactive game disk entitled Max Magic for the Philips CD-i system; in its first few months of release, it won six industry awards. In 1999, Max was acknowledged in a special \"Interactive Magic\" category of the World Magic Awards, broadcast on the FoxFamily network. In 2000, he was brought back to receive the \"Best Mentalist\" prize. He has also received multiple awards from the Society of American Magicians and the International Brotherhood of Magicians. In 1988 he was presented with the Tenkai Prize, the highest award in Japanese magic; this was the first time this honor was ever given to a foreign artist. Some years back, Max was named Lecturer of the Year by the Academy of Magical Arts (Magic Castle) in Hollywood, and in 1998 he was the recipient of a Creative Fellowship from that organization. The late Orson Welles wrote that Max Maven has \"the most original mind in magic.\" He\'s published over 1700 creations in the conjuring literature, and been an advisor to over a hundred television shows. As a consultant he has worked with David Copperfield, Siegfried & Roy, Doug Henning, Penn & Teller, Lance Burton, and many others. He has also directed revue shows for several major American gambling casinos. Recently, Magic magazine, the leading intraprofessional conjuring journal, published a list of the 100 most influential people in the field of theatrical magic during the 20th century. Included on the list is Max Maven, cited for \"entertaining and astonishing audiences with his bizarre brand of mental magic.... [M]ost of Maven\'s mind-boggling feats are accomplished through psychological subterfuge that he himself has cunningly created... If mystery does indeed give magic its meaning, then the enigmatic persona of Max Maven makes us ever mindful of the art that is hidden in the mystery of magic.\" This ongoing exploration of the mysterious side of human nature led to Max Maven\'s Book of Fortunetelling, published by Prentice Hall in late 1992. He is a Senior Research Consultant to the Center for Scientific Anomalies Research in Michigan, and on the Board of Advisors of the California ScienCenter in Los Angeles, where his interactive material is featured in a new exhibit, Magic: The Science of Illusion, that will tour museums across North America through 2007. Currently in bookstores you can find The Complete Idiot\'s Guide to Magic by Tom Ogden, and The Complete Idiot\'s Guide to Improving Your Memory by Michael Kurland and Richard Lupoff. Max Maven was the technical advisor for both. He has also created customized \"Maximize\" seminars on mental efficiency and non-verbal communication for executives and salespeople from top corporations. Max Maven has a fascinating history. He has been a successful radio announcer, graphic designer, author, pianist, teacher, singer, actor, lecturer, screenwriter, composer, advertising consultant, and chef. He reads over 150 books and magazines each month, and this constant flow of information provides a continual stimulation of new ideas for presenting his uncanny abilities. In 1998, Max Maven spent many weeks in Canada, taping 26 episodes of The MAXimum Dimension,a series of half-hour shows aimed at overcoming math phobia among young kids, using interactive games and puzzles to explore the mysterious and fun side of mathematics. The series has been airing on the SCN and TVO networks. In the Toronto Sun, TV critic Claire Bickley wrote that she was \"blown away\" by the show, hailing it as \"an addictive, fun format.\" Clearly, viewers agree: The serieshas been placing among the top six highest rated shows on TVO. Recently, Magic magazine, a leading trade journal for magicians, covered the series for their international readership. The article is reprinted here, with permission of editor Stan Allen and reporter Mac King. MAXIMUM DIMENSION GOES TO SCHOOL By Mac King Max Maven has a kid show. Nope, you read that right -- Max Maven has a kid show. Actually it\'s a weekly Canadian TV series aimed at children seven to eleven years old. So far, they\'ve taped 26, which is two seasons worth of programs. I watched a few episodes, and I liked them. Actually, that\'s not quite true. I thought they were great. Max was charming and cute (perhaps not words that immediately come to mind when you think of Max), the show was educational without being dry and dull, and it seemed to me that kids would really enjoy it. But, I\'m getting close to 40 years old (not exactly the target age the show is aiming for), so what do I know about a show for kids? So here\'s what I did. I arranged to screen one episode of the show to Ms. Grubaugh\'s fourth grade class at Selma Bartlett Elementary School here in Las Vegas. I wanted to know what real ten-year-olds thought of the show. I arrived at 1:30 on a sunny Tuesday afternoon (which I believe is the time the class normally spends studying blackjack strategy). I gave them the little speech I had prepared. \"I\'m here today to show you a TV program that airs in Canada. Does anybody know what state Canada is in?\" They thought I was an idiot. \"The star of this TV show is a magician, and I\'m a magician who has been charged with writing a review of this TV show for a magazine for other magicians.\" A girl\'s questioning hand shot up. \"Why are they charging you to write for them?\" she asked. (This is completely true.) \"Okay, I\'ll quit trying to be funny,\" sez I, \"and we\'ll get right to the video. It\'s about 25 minutes long. When it\'s over, we\'ll take about 15 minutes for you to write answers to a few questions about what you thought of the show. Then we\'ll talk about the program a little bit, and you\'ll be free to go.\" The episode that was shown that day, begins with a \"come up and touch your TV screen \" kind of interactive game that has become associated with Max\'s many TV appearances in the United States. Having already watched the show, my attention was primarily focused on the kids and their reactions. When Max invited them to come up to the TV and touch the screen they all remained seated at their desks, but extended their arms and hands out toward the television. (top) The first season featured actors Patrice Goodman and Chris Ross. (bottom) The second season featured actors Kevin Robson and Alison Heiberg. It was a pretty cool sight to see this room full of kids pointing together at the diagram of X\'s and O\'s on the screen. Max gave them instructions on how to make each move, and I watched as their hands counted and made minute movements across the air. After each step, Max eliminated one or more of the unoccupied spaces. Of course, the idea was for Max to take away only spaces that the kids were not occupying, or in this case, pointing at. Each time there was a elimination of spaces on the screen, there was an audible gasp from the entire classroom. And when Max made the final elimination and every kid had ended up on the same square, they all literally cheered. There are four characters in the show: a boy named Benjamin, a woman named Samantha, a translucent, floating, digitally animated, talking sphere named Pi, and Max Maven. Max is like a kind, but slightly eccentric, uncle who\'s always dispensing droll advice and brain teaser fun to the other two human characters. Each of the shows is loosely built around a plot designed to illustrate a particular mathematical principle or \"theme.\" This show\'s theme was introduced in that first interactive sequence. The remaining 20 minutes contained brain-teasers and puzzles designed to explore various aspects of this mathematical principle. The kids continued to be riveted to the screen right up to the end of the program. Before Ms. Grubaugh could stop the tape, the beginning of the next episode started. Seeing that there was more than one of these shows on the cassette prompted one kid to say, \"Can we watch one of these every day?\" At first, this seemed to be a ringing endorsement for Max\'s show, but then I realized that watching these programs is simply easier than studying blackjack odds. After the show, I asked the students to write down the answer to four questions. What did you like most about the show? What did you like least about the show? Did the X/O (interactive) game work for you? How do you think the X/O game worked? Their answers were most enlightening. In their answers to my first question, the kids all indicated that they loved Max and Pi. They thought Max was really funny, which I guess makes sense. He\'s always had a kind of cartoonish quality about him, and his raised eyebrow and bemused look seem strangely suitable here in the kid show genre. The answers to the second question of what did you like least, most of the kids liked Samantha the least. But in this particular episode, she was supposed to be doing something annoying to drive the plot along, so it seems unfair to say they didn\'t like her. The answers to the third question I found to be very fascinating. When Max seemingly guessed correctly where they were on the X/O gameboard the kids expressed it as \"I won,\" instead of \"Max won.\" This is, to me, a very important distinction, indicating that they didn\'t feel themselves to be in an adversarial relationship with Max. As for the fourth question (how the X/O interactive game worked), these answers were my favorites. They ranged from oddly correct, \"I thought it worked because they set it up so you had to move a certain way\"; to the not quite as probable, \"He might just have read your mind.\" After writing their answers to my questions, I asked the class if they had any questions for me. The most popular question was: \"Are they going to make this show in this country?\" Which is all the validation I needed of my assessment -- kids would really enjoy this show. You\'ve read the self-help books and listened to the tapes. You\'ve got the skills and the motivation to take on the world. What\'s the biggest obstacle standing in between you and success? In a single word, communication. If you can\'t effectively convey your ideas to others, you can\'t reach your goals -- get that job, make that sale, close that deal. Now, what if there was a system that would guarantee to improve your ability to get your message across? More than that, what if there was a system that gave you the ability to substantially increase your ability to understand other people? There is. It\'s called MAXimize. Max Maven has astonished audiences in over two dozen countries with demonstrations of \"mindreading\" built upon a thorough knowledge of such techniques as kinesics, proxemics, pupillometrics and metalinguistics. If we get past these fancy scientific terms, we mean non-verbal communication -- what is popularly known as \"body language.\" We tend to think of communication as being based on the words we speak, but the simple fact is that spoken language accounts for only about twenty percent of the information we give and take. The rest is covered by a range of non-verbal communications. Each of us has an instinctive ability with this; we\'ve been doing it literally since birth. However, few of us are consciously aware of the process; it just happens. Now, imagine the advantages of learning to apply these techniques deliberately. That\'s what the MAXimize system is all about. Imagine using these techniques to control the ways that other people perceive you. You can refine and direct your message with a precision that is simply unavailable to the average person. Consider what an advantage this could give you in job interviews, sales meetings, and other important interactions. But there\'s more, because MAXimize involves a two-way process. Using these techniques will allow you to \"read\" another person with astonishing accuracy. With these techniques you will be able to go behind a person\'s surface messages, and find out what they\'re really thinking. These communication secrets are not difficult to learn, because they are natural techniques that you are already using. What the MAXimize system provides is a practical and easy way to build your awareness and understanding of these techniques, so that you can use them to their fullest potential. And there\'s more, because Max Maven can also teach you remarkably easy ways to improve your memory skills, and show you practical methods to enrich your overall mental efficiency. He\'s put together customized seminars for a wide range of academic, sales and business groups; he can do the same for your group.

www.maxmaven.com/index1.php


Candy Max Maven

Candy Max Maven

www.cindythings.com/candymax.htm


Guest Maven The Magic Caf

The Los Angeles Daily News called him \"A master showman\" The St. Louis Post-Dispatch dubbed him \"A master of repartee\" Television\'s Entertainment Tonight summed it up: \"He\'s the master mindreader\" Indeed. Using an advanced (and highly unorthodox) set of psychological principles and techniques, Max is able to discern the thoughts of total strangers. Subliminal persuasion and the power of suggestion are pushed to the limit. People magazine hailed his work as \"A new form of participatory theater\" This is weird stuff--and audiences love it. Max Maven\'s mysteries transcend linguistic and cultural boundaries: He\'s performed in over two dozen countries. His full-evening one-man show, Thinking in Person, had a critically acclaimed two-month run at the Beverly Hills Playhouse, and he has headlined nightclubs across the U.S., setting house records in over half of those venues. Max has appeared on hundreds of television and radio programs, top talkshows and variety specials, as well as acting on comedy and dramatic shows including the starring role on Count DeClues\' Mystery Castle for the Fox network, and guest-starring on Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and General Hospital. In 1998, Max developed and starred in a new Canadian series, The MAXimum Dimension, an offbeat educational show aimed at younger viewers, involving recreational mathematics. The 26 episodes were a popular success, placing among the top six shows on the TVO network. Other TV credits include hosting eight network specials in Japan (performing in Japanese), and creating a pair of his own specials in Thailand. In 1994 he hosted a 12-part series for HTV in England, Something Strange with Max Maven, a talk-show exploring all aspects of the paranormal. The show set a ratings record, and led to a second series the following year. Max Mystery Show, a 13-part series, was a hit for the CTS network in Taiwan in 1995. He was the only regular on the ten-part Magiskt series for TV4 in Sweden; that show scored great ratings, and two more series followed, one for Norwegian television in early 1996, plus another for Sweden later that year. He has also appeared on shows in Finland, Scotland, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Chile, and many other countries. Max is prominently featured on the 1998 PBS documentary The Art of Magic, as well as The Secret World on The Learning Channel. His television work in the year 2000 includes an appearance on Heroes of Magic on Channel 4 in Great Britain, and being the only regular guest on the Masters of Illusion series for the PAX network. Max is particularly well known for his pioneering work in interactive broadcasting. He created the ground-breaking video Max Maven\'s Mindgames for MCA. His games were a regular feature on the popular Best of Magic series for the ITV network in England. His interactive work was included on The World\'s Greatest Magic, NBC\'s highest rated special of 1994, and he was the first artist booked for the 1995 edition, and brought back yet again in 1997. When Landmark Entertainment developed Caesars Magical Empire for Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, they asked Max to devise a set of interactive mysteries that take place between customers and an impish wizard, \"Maximus Maven\" eight inches tall, who appears \"holographically\" behind the central bar. The wizard is named bears an uncanny resemblance to a certain modern performer. Max has also devised material for the world of computer technology, creating an interactive game disk entitled Max Magic for the Philips CD-i system; in its first few months of release, it won six industry awards. In 1999, Max was acknowledged in a special \"Interactive Magic\" category of the World Magic Awards, broadcast on the FoxFamily network. In 2000, he was brought back to receive the \"Best Mentalist\" prize. He has also received multiple awards from the Society of American Magicians and the International Brotherhood of Magicians. In 1988 he was presented with the Tenkai Prize, the highest award in Japanese magic; this was the first time this honor was ever given to a foreign artist. Some years back, Max was named Lecturer of the Year by the Academy of Magical Arts (Magic Castle) in Hollywood, and in 1998 he was the recipient of a Creative Fellowship from that organization. The late Orson Welles wrote that Max Maven has \"the most original mind in magic\" He\'s published over 1700 creations in the conjuring literature, and been an advisor to over a hundred television shows. As a consultant he has worked with David Copperfield, Siegfried & Roy, Doug Henning, Penn & Teller, Lance Burton, and many others. He has also directed revue shows for several major American gambling casinos. Recently, Magic magazine, the leading intraprofessional conjuring journal, published a list of the 100 most influential people in the field of theatrical magic during the 20th century. Included on the list is Max Maven, cited for \"entertaining and astonishing audiences with his bizarre brand of mental magic.... [M]ost of Maven\'s mind-boggling feats are accomplished through psychological subterfuge that he himself has cunningly created... If mystery does indeed give magic its meaning, then the enigmatic persona of Max Maven makes us ever mindful of the art that is hidden in the mystery of magic.\" This ongoing exploration of the mysterious side of human nature led to Max Maven\'s Book of Fortunetelling, published by Prentice Hall in late 1992. He is a Senior Research Consultant to the Center for Scientific Anomalies Research in Michigan, and on the Board of Advisors of the California ScienCenter in Los Angeles, where his interactive material is featured in a new exhibit, Magic: The Science of Illusion, that will tour museums across North America through 2007. Currently in bookstores you can find The Complete Idiot\'s Guide to Magic by Tom Ogden, and The Complete Idiot\'s Guide to Improving Your Memory by Michael Kurland and Richard Lupoff. Max Maven was the technical advisor for both. He has also created customized \"Maximize\" seminars on mental efficiency and non-verbal communication for executives and salespeople from top corporations. Max Maven has a fascinating history. He has been a successful radio announcer, graphic designer, author, pianist, teacher, singer, actor, lecturer, screenwriter, composer, advertising consultant, and chef. He reads over 150 books and magazines each month, and this constant flow of information provides a continual stimulation of new ideas for presenting his uncanny abilities.

www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewforum.php?forum=160&641


Nothing DVD mentalism show

Max Maven traveled from Hollywood to Lake Tahoe. He brought NOTHING but a nice suit. On the way from the airport to the studio, he stopped at a supermarket for less than ten minutes and spent less than ten dollars. Once in his room, he spent less than half an hour preparing, and proceeded to go on stage and do a 50-minute performance of mentalism. Featuring Eugene Burger, Brandon Combs, Gene Matsuura, Stephen Minch, Jan Rose and Michael Weber. NO Pre-Show Work NO Stooges NO Clipboards NO Nailwriters NO Playing Cards NO ESP Cards NO Billets NO Wallets NO Gaffs NO Gimmicks NO Special Materials NO Muscle Reading NO Hypnotism NO Threads NO Mirrors NO Electronics NO Rough & Smooth NO Gilbreath Principle NO Filler in fact, NOTHING but solid mentalism and great entertainment. Let\'s be clear. This is not a cluster of \"substitute\" stuff to make up for having lost your props. It is a full-length show of top-notch real world material, much of it revealed for the very first time. The complete work, including variations and options, plus discussion of performance structure, scripting segues, audience management, blocking, timing-everything thoroughly explained with an unprecedented degree of detail. Included is the rare \"Para-Sight\" routine, out of print for over 25 years; copies of the original limited-release manuscript have sold for as much as $400. And that\'s something! A two-DVD set (with as much content as most three-DVD sets). Running time: 230 minutes, plus Easter Eggs and bonus material.

www.elmwoodmagic.com/?nd=full&key=4158&myaf=15363


Videoclip Nothing mentalism

Videoclip Nothing mentalism

youtube.com/watch?v=L69ATZI9ZPY


Videomind DVD\'s for mentalists

Volume One - Parlor Mentalism It\'s done under what can be the most difficult conditions: performing for a medium - sized audience with no formal stage setting to focus attention. Sightlines are often poor, and people must be drawn into the experience even if they can\'t see everything clearly. Too, you may be working surrounded, so you\'d better be sure there are no angle problems. And, as it\'s likely to be a social occasion filled with potential distractions, your material needs to be compelling from the very first moment: intriguing presentations that build to powerful conclusions. This video features a range of commercial Parlor Mentalism. No pre-show work, no secret assistance; this is practical material for the solo performer, using subtle and unusual methods that are as fascinating as the effects they produce. You\'ll learn: The Mockingbird - A sampling from the fabled \"Birds of Prey\" series. At its core, an inexplicable demonstration of playing card telepathy - but you\'ll discover how audience participation and an unfolding plot structure can transform an already strong effect into a full - fledged routine. Autome - An extraordinary book test using plain, ungimmicked props under the fairest conditions. This is a remarkable routine in and of itself, but it also introduces principles for which you\'ll find a host of other uses. Divine Write - (Previously Unrevealed): Mutual mentalism with built - in appeal. The performer tries an imposing experiment in clairvoyance, working simultaneously with a member of the audience. Despite the overwhelming odds, the outcome is successful for both! Zenvelopes: - A test of intuition using several participants and a number of ESP symbol cards hidden inside opaque envelopes. These are thoroughly mixed by the spectators, who then pair them off by playing their hunches. When the contents are examined, all the symbols have matched perfectly. Kurotsuke - (Previously Unrevealed) An ancient game from the imperial court of Japan is turned into a delightful routine of stand - up mentalism that lets several people get involved. And, best of all, it can be done entirely impromptu using only borrowed materials. The Mind\'s Eye Deck - A pack of some 40 design cards is used. Each one is different, and the deck is shuffled. While the performer\'s back is turned, a spectator removes a card. Without turning around, the mentalist starts describing the thought - of design, eventually drawing it on a pad of paper. It\'s as straightforward as that. Volume Two - Close-Up Mentalism Perhaps the most intimate form of entertainment that can be presented in public. It requires a delicate interplay in order to achieve a balance between the charming and the disquieting. This is material designed for very small groups, or even working one - on - one. This video features a range of commercial Close - Up Mentalism. No pre - show work, no secret assistance; this is practical material for the solo performer, using subtle and unusual methods that are as fascinating as the effects they produce. You\'ll learn: Shape - Up (Previously Unrevealed) - One card has been removed from as ESP deck. A person is invited to deal through the rest of the pack, turning cards face - up one by one and stopping at any time. The stopped - at symbol is the same as on the card that was previously set aside. Changeling - A pleasingly simple routine using a handful of ordinary coins, in which the mentalist successfully predicts precisely how many coins will be selected by the spectator. Isolation - The participant chooses which of several unprepared magazines will be used. That is opened to a random page, from which a random word is noted while the performer\'s head is turned away. In a convincing telepathic display, the mentalist extracts the word from the person\'s mind Key To The Future - An amiable variation on the classic \"Seven Keys to Baldpate\" effect using an ungimmicked padlock and several keys, only one of which can open the lock. This time it is the spectator whose psychic abilities are tested. Will the working key be located - and will the performer know the outcome in advance? Symbalance (Previously Unrevealed) - A standard pack of ESP symbol cards is employed along with two participants. The mentalist divines the first person\'s thought - of design. He then discerns the second person\'s symbol with an offbeat demonstration of \"tactile intuition.\"; Positive Negative - A lesson in spectator management in the form of an engaging bit of prognostic pantomime with a baffling payoff. Better yet, it\'s completely impromptu - you an do it with a moment\'s notice, using borrowed items. The Hawk - Another impossible card routine from the \"Birds of Prey\" series. Two spectators select and replace cards while the performer\'s back is turned. They also shuffle the deck. Nevertheless, the mentalist deals through the face - down pack and stops on one selection, then tops that by promptly naming the other. Formal performance conditions: a stage, a schedule, and the obligation to entertain an audience of paying customers. What you need for this type of situation is material that will allow you to connect with a large group; routines that are efficiently structured for maximum impact so that they\'ll generate interest, maintain a robust energy level, and hold the spectators\' attention from start to finish. Goal Mine (Previously Unrevealed) - This is an ideal opener: a routine of mental persuasion that serves to establish the performer\'s credentials, gets several audience members involved, has a climax that virtually guarantees laughter and applause - and all of the props can fit in your breast pocket. Tossed - Out Tech (Previously Unrevealed) - One of the most valuable techniques of mentalism has also been one of the least understood - until now. This section covers an effect that has been a feature item in Max Maven\'s professional repertoire for over two decades. This is not a basic \"bare bones\" description; it is an in - depth analysis; knowledge developed through years of study, and honed during thousands of performances. The information that is disclosed here constitutes a virtual \"post - graduate course\" in mentalism. Khan Artist (Previously Unrevealed) - The performer forecasts how members of the audience will rearrange a set of symbols. The props are so uncomplicated, so innocent in appearance....it\'s no wonder that this deceptively simple effect has hoodwinked some of the keenest minds in the business. Contimental - Could there be more direct exhibition of mindreading? Consider this: A spectator thinks of an international location; the mentalist reveals it. The end. There\'s no advance work, nothing is written down, and there are no props required. You can even perform this over the elephone Psign - A prediction, quick and to the point. A large board is displayed, back - out. A spectator selects one of eight different designs, which proves to be the very one printed on the front of the board. The participant can stay seated in the audience - leaving the performer alone on stage at the finish, to accept all of the applause.

www.elmwoodmagic.com/?nd=full&key=1168&myaf=15363



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